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There’s nothing quite as inspiring as a really good book.

You’ve made the decision to go it alone and startup your own business, but how do you get the advice and help you need to make the right decisions? Trial and error can work, but why not take advice from people who’ve gone through the process, made the mistakes and learned from them and are willing to share that advice with you?

Reading books is a great way to help you get ideas on productivity, business planning and general inspiration. Here are our tip 5 tips for books that will light a fire under your startup business and have you raring to go!

Top 5 books for startup inspiration

Rework by Jason Fried and David Hansson

Rework is a book that encourages startup business owners to rethink the standards of business that have just become accepted wisdom over the years. You know the type of information, often provided by business advice centres and consultants: prepare a plan, do a SWOT analysis and look at the competition, get investors…

Rework takes a different approach that shows you a faster way to get your business of the ground and turns old business thinking on its head. For example, the authors explain why planning at the outset can actually be harmful to your business. Heady stuff.

The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg

Despite the title, this isn’t one of a slew of self-help books on overcoming bad habits; or at least, it’s not just that. Instead, Duhigg explores how habits shape individuals, organisation and societies, giving psychological background on how and why habits work, and how the canny business owner can harness that.

Working out how to make your product or service a habit for the customer is what distinguishes floundering startups from runaway success. Think Facebook; once a fledging idea, it has now grown into something of a compulsion, and Mark Zuckerberg has benefitted greatly from that success.

Startupland by Mikkel Svane

Svane launched Zendesk and it became so successful that it recently floated on the New York Stock Exchange; so, you know you’re getting the best advice here. He gives solid, down to earth advice on raising funding and handling growth.

What distinguishes this book from other modern startup books, though, is the fact that is goes against the trend. It’s not about a cocky, digital whizzkid who hits upon the latest idea and becomes an overnight billionaire, as is the dream of many who view Silicon Valley with envy. Instead, it’s about hard work with a real business, built by people who have lives and families to balance. You might find it more relatable than some other modern startup books.

The Lean Startup by Eric Ries

You get out what you put in, is the old adage, and if that’s the case, then if we want a successful business we have to put in a huge amount of effort, time, resources and capital. Not so, says Ries; how offers a perspective that prefers minimising wasted resources and puts learning front and centre.

While it’s focused on product development, the five principles that Ries espouses can be applied to any entrepreneur or startup, and help you to get off the ground with a minimum of investment.

The 4-Hour Work Week by Time Ferriss

This book caused something of a revolution on its release, as Ferriss shows how you can launch and run a successful business with the minimum of effort, through careful planning and efficiency. As per The Lean Startup and other books here, a lot of Ferriss’ advice goes against accepted wisdoms about business.

He advises that over time you can make gradual changes that allow you to work less without compromising success, through time management, focus and benefitting from new technologies. Ideal reading for anyone who bristles at the idea that they have to give up their lives to make their startups work.

Choose one of our home office bookcases for your perfect startup library

We carry an amazing range of high quality home office bookcases that are both practical and stylish. House all of your important reading material in a convenient, organised way, with a great choice of classic and contemporary designs.

Our home office bookcases are available in a wide variety of colours and wood veneers, so there’s something for everyone no matter what your taste. You can take a look at the full range and talk to our sales advice team if you’d like some help with choosing the perfect bookcase for your office.

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Last Modified / Updated on: May 21, 2018 at 10:24 am

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    A box drawer is a 6” high drawer in a pedestal or cabinet. It is intended to store small items e.g. pens and pencils, calculator, or other smaller stationery items.

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